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Math Help - lcm of numbers

  1. #1
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    lcm of numbers

    wat is the lcm of -3\5 and 3\5???????
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by inolas_cul View Post
    wat is the lcm of -3\5 and 3\5???????
    Are you working in Q? If so then the lcm can be any non-zero element because Q is a field.
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    wat????
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    Quote Originally Posted by inolas_cul View Post
    wat????
    lol, apparently TPH thought you were at a higher level of math than you actually are.

    i think what you meant to say is that you want the LCD, which is the same as the LCM of the denominators. In that case the answer would be 5. Since 5 is the smallest number that both denominators can divide into
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    I understand now.*

    I assumed the reader was asking "lcm (3/5, -3/5) = ?"

    But now I understand that he was asking what is the lowest common denominator to add those fractions.

    *)One reason why I suspected that is because the user picked India as his home country. Since India is far superior to America in math I assumed it was a higher level question.
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    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThePerfectHacker View Post
    I understand now.*

    I assumed the reader was asking "lcm (3/5, -3/5) = ?"

    But now I understand that he was asking what is the lowest common denominator to add those fractions.
    i figured. but going back to what you said, how does working in Q get you to that answer?

    i never did a lot of stuff with LCM, LCD, and GCD myself in school just enough to do things like add fractions and such. or maybe i did, but i never started paying attention in class until i got to college

    *)One reason why I suspected that is because the user picked India as his home country. Since India is far superior to America in math I assumed it was a higher level question.
    well, that's true
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jhevon View Post
    i figured. but going back to what you said, how does working in Q get you to that answer?
    Greatest common divisor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Unique factorization domain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    This is what I was thinking.
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