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Math Help - working out percentages on paper

  1. #1
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    working out percentages on paper

    Hello i apoligise if this is in the wrong forum but, i was wondering could anyone be kind enough to explain how i would work out the following problem on paper

    if i had 70 calls and 24 of those were loan applications, what % of my calls were loan applications?

    I think using a calculator i would 24/70=0.34 x100 =34% for my answer.

    However how would i do this without a calculator? im not sure how i would work this division out on paper.

    thanks in advance
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  2. #2
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    e^(i*pi)'s Avatar
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    Cancel out factors: \dfrac{24}{70} = \dfrac{12}{35}. Since 35ths aren't common then division will be necessary to get the necessary numbers of decimal places.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike2000 View Post
    Hello i apoligise if this is in the wrong forum but, i was wondering could anyone be kind enough to explain how i would work out the following problem on paper

    if i had 70 calls and 24 of those were loan applications, what % of my calls were loan applications?

    I think using a calculator i would 24/70=0.34 x100 =34% for my answer.

    However how would i do this without a calculator? im not sure how i would work this division out on paper.

    thanks in advance
    \displaystyle\frac{24}{70}=\frac{x}{100}

    where x is the percentage.
    Multiply both sides by 100

    \displaystyle\frac{2400}{70}=x=\frac{240}{7}

    Just divide through by 7.
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  4. #4
    Junior Member RHandford's Avatar
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    Sorry my error
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  5. #5
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    Hiya thanks for the help, could you show how you get those numbers? im sorry im a bit lost as to were you have gotten 2400/70 and 240/7 from

    Thank you
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike2000 View Post
    Hiya thanks for the help, could you show how you get those numbers? im sorry im a bit lost as to were you have gotten 2400/70 and 240/7 from

    Thank you
    Sure..

    24 out of 70 calls were loan applications, so your fraction is \frac{loan\  apps}{total\ calls}=\frac{24}{70}

    You want to write this fraction as a percentage.
    Percent means "per century" or "per hundred".

    For instance, exam results are typically given as a percentage,
    which is a fraction.

    80\% means "80 out of 100", so written as a fraction it's \frac{80}{100}

    We want to express your fraction as "something" out of 100, so we write

    \frac{24}{70}=\frac{x}{100}

    We want x by itself. We can obtain that by multiplying both sides by 100

    100\frac{24}{70}=100\frac{x}{100}

    \frac{24(100)}{70}=\frac{100x}{100}

    \frac{2400}{70}=x which can be simplified by writing this as \frac{10}{10}\ \frac{240}{7}=\frac{240}{7}
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