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Math Help - Little Bits and Bobs!

  1. #1
    Member Sazza's Avatar
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    Smile Little Bits and Bobs!

    Hey, is: 2(4-y) a product? How will i be able to tell??
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  2. #2
    Member Sazza's Avatar
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    I'm doing expressions: and i know that the first term in the brackets you multiply that by the closesed whole number immediatly beside it, and stuff!
    (example: 2(s + 4)=2s + 8)
    but for this: 4(9 - y) what would i do?
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  3. #3
    Member Sazza's Avatar
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    and also, with: 3(d + e) since there is no number where the "e" is situated!
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  4. #4
    Forum Admin topsquark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sazza View Post
    Hey, is: 2(4-y) a product? How will i be able to tell??
    A "product" is defined to be the multiplication of two numbers. 2 and 4 - y are numbers. Thus this is the product of 2 and 4 - y.

    -Dan
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    Forum Admin topsquark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sazza View Post
    I'm doing expressions: and i know that the first term in the brackets you multiply that by the closesed whole number immediatly beside it, and stuff!
    (example: 2(s + 4)=2s + 8)
    but for this: 4(9 - y) what would i do?
    This deals with the "Distributive Law of Multiplication Over Addition" (Yes, I know you are subtracting, but adding and subtracting are substantially the same process.) This law says if we have the three numbers a, b, and c that:
    a*(b + c) = a*b + a*c
    or
    (a + b)*c = a*c + b*c
    (For technical reasons there is a difference between the two statements. If a, b, and c are real numbers and "+" and "*" are ordinary addition/subtraction and multiplication respectively then the two statements are identical.)

    In your case:
    4(9 - y) = 4(9 + (-y)) = 4*9 + 4*(-y) = 4*9 - 4*y = 36 - 4y

    -Dan
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  6. #6
    Forum Admin topsquark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sazza View Post
    and also, with: 3(d + e) since there is no number where the "e" is situated!
    Like the last problem:
    3(d + e) = 3*d + 3*e = 3d + 3e

    -Dan
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  7. #7
    Member Sazza's Avatar
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    2ab + 3a-ab! Does that equal 5ab? Because i'm not sure weather to include the a.?? or is it 5ababa???
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  8. #8
    Forum Admin topsquark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sazza View Post
    2ab + 3a-ab! Does that equal 5ab? Because i'm not sure weather to include the a.?? or is it 5ababa???
    You can only add "like" terms together. So if the variables don't match EXACTLY you can't add them. You have
    2ab + 3a - ab

    We can only subtract the ab from the 2ab. The 3a has no matching term. So this is:
    2ab + 3a - ab = 2ab - ab + 3a = (2ab - ab) + 3a = ab + 3a

    -Dan
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