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Math Help - Can anyone recommend an algebra home study course?

  1. #1
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    Can anyone recommend an algebra home study course?

    I am a pretty numeric (although I balk at saying that on a Math's forum) adult, but I want to bring my skills up to speed on things like Algebra. Like a lot of people the last time I did Algebra was when I was at school.

    I'm not looking to solve the mysteries of the universe - just acheive a basic competence with algebra to begin with, and was wondering if anyone knew of a course/book/dvd etc that you can follow at home that explains things clearly.

    I'm sure I should be able to pick it up fairly easily if I can find a resource that explains things well and actually explains the technical terms before using them.

    Thanks!
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  2. #2
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    Algebra Home Study Course

    Hey,

    Here you can find algebra tutorials, lesson plans and find answers of your maths questions Free Algebra Homework Help - Online Algebra Tutorials and Lessons – Math Tutorials at LiftMinds.com.

    Regards,
    Misty
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by liftminds View Post
    Hey,

    Here you can find algebra tutorials, lesson plans and find answers of your maths questions Free Algebra Homework Help - Online Algebra Tutorials and Lessons – Math Tutorials at LiftMinds.com.

    Regards,
    Misty
    OK it's a great site and it must have taken some work to put that together. But this is an example of what I mean by explaining and teaching things in a clear and understandable way.

    I started reading this site, and got to here;

    Algrbraic expressions algebraic expressions - Lesson

    That page is quoted as saying ;

    Definition: algebraic expression
    A group of terms being added or subtracted (separated by the and - signs) is called an algebraic expression.
    I'm pretty sure you have a typo there and meant to include the (+) sign.

    But even so, you then state that the following are algebraic expressions;

    •If the algebraic expression consists of two terms, it is called a binomial.

    For example:

    3x 2

    4y 2z
    But didn't you just say that algebraic expressions are terms seperated by the plus and minus signs? If so, where are the plus and minus signs?

    No doubt someone with knowledge of algebra would find this basic question amusing, but to a reader, like myself who is trying to learn - the explanation just doesn't seem to make sense.

    Obviously when you are defining what "algebraic expressions" are, at this point I am paying close attention since, I am aware how important the terminology is going to be. You can't carry out instructions and answer questions if you don't understand the terminology.






    Definition: algebraic expression A group of terms being added or subtracted (separated by the and - signs) is called an algebraic expression



    Definition: algebraic expression A group of terms being added or subtracted (separated by the and - signs) is called an algebraic expression
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Layman View Post
    But didn't you just say that algebraic expressions are terms seperated by the plus and minus signs? If so, where are the plus and minus signs?
    Ignore these websites. They are riddled with typos and errors. I incidentally happen to have the link to an old book on elementary algebra in my Ctrl+v (as I just found it for someone else in the other thread), which pretty well explains what an expression is in its first page. Click on here to view it. It's pity that it's no longer used in schools (it's about a century and a quarter years old), because most books on elementary algebra today aren't as good as it's.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCoffeeMachine View Post
    Ignore these websites. They are riddled with typos and errors. I incidentally happen to have the link to an old book on elementary algebra in my Ctrl+v (as I just found it for someone else in the other thread), which pretty well explains what an expression is in its first page. Click on here to view it. It's pity that it's no longer used in schools (it's about a century and a quarter years old), because most books on elementary algebra today aren't as good as it's.
    So it does...... I don't suppose that book is still available as a hard copy is it anywhere?

    I do actually believe that there is a problem with the way maths (and other subjects for that matter) are taught in schools these days. I often wonder if the teachers themselves (and i'm referencing the UK here - I don't know what the case is in the US) fully understand what they are teaching - as I believe that to be able to explain something clearly you need to fully understand it.

    I watched a TV programme (program) on Channel 4 in the UK called "Dispatches" which featured a maths teacher called Richard Dunne. With levels of numeracy failing in UK schools, he demonstrated a method of teaching called "Maths makes sense" and within a couple of weeks, kids wer able to solve fraction problems that would stump many adults.

    I would be interested in getting a book by him, but can't seem to find one at the moment that is aimed at adults who want to improve their maths skills.
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  6. #6
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    Actually, further to my last post I think I may have found a book by him that is aimed at adults....

    Mathematics for Primary Teachers: An Audit & Self-Study Guide Qualified teacher statusm: Amazon.co.uk: Sue Jennings, Richard Dunne: Books

    I know this is aimed at Primary school teachers but I suspect it may contain an explanation of the method of his teaching. I am going to order this as I think it is definately worth a look. Viewing the TV programme (program) I mentioned, it was amazing to see the kids "get it".

    Let me know if you see that century old book for sale anywhere though!
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  7. #7
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    The old book is available at here (on Amazon) for sale. And here are the number of books that they (Hall and Knight) have written. It includes Higher Algebra, a sequel to Elementary Algebra, which is more advanced as you might expect. I don't think they wrote the book that you have found. It certainly says it was written by Sue Jennings and Richard Dunne, not Henry Sinclair Hall and Samuel Ratcliff Knight. So I wouldn't know whether it's good or not. What I would recommend you to do is to print the first chapter of Elementary Algebra (you might probably have to download it first) and then see how it goes. Try to follow the examples, do the exercises, and if you think it's good enough for your purposes, then order it.
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