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Math Help - [SOLVED] Fraction using exponents and parenthesis

  1. #1
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    Arrow [SOLVED] Fraction using exponents and parenthesis

    Hi everyone first time here, got 2 questions, I'm pretty sure I got the first one rite but would like a second opinion and would like to no how to solve the second one....

    First one is:

    Simplify:


    And would I be rite in saying the answer is :


    Second is this:


    I'm confused as to how I should handle the exponents which are both inside and outside of the parenthesis ?? Any help will be greatly appreciated
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  2. #2
    MHF Contributor harish21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JamesC1705 View Post
    Hi everyone first time here, got 2 questions, I'm pretty sure I got the first one rite but would like a second opinion and would like to no how to solve the second one....

    First one is:

    Simplify:


    And would I be rite in saying the answer is :


    Second is this:


    I'm confused as to how I should handle the exponents which are both inside and outside of the parenthesis ?? Any help will be greatly appreciated
    The first one is good. You can simplify it further:

    \frac{9x^2}{12y^2} = \frac{3x^2}{4y^2}

    For the second one:

    \frac{(4x^{3}y)^2}{x^5} = \frac{4x^{3}y \times 4x^{3}y}{x^5}

    OR

    \frac{(4x^{3}y)^2}{x^5} = \frac{(4^2)(x^3)^{2}(y^2)}{x^5}



    Can you do it now?
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    getting there ....

    Hi, and thanks for your reply,

    First up the code option is rather exciting - gonna have a go at that is a sec...

    With the first problem am I rite in saying you have divided by 3 because it's the greatest common factor?

    Now... I'm going to try coding my answer to the second problem:


    Regarding \frac{(4x^{3}y)^2}{x^5} = \frac{4x^{3}y \times 4x^{3}y}{x^5}<br />

    So effectively we are performing  \frac{4x^{3}y}{x^5} twice to acount for the fact that the top part is raised to the power of 2?

    So  \frac{4x^{3}y}{x^5} = \frac{4y}{x^2}

    Meaning \frac{4x^{3}y \times 4x^{3}y}{x^5} = \frac{16y^2}{x^4} ??


    Thanks in advance for your help - James
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  4. #4
    MHF Contributor harish21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JamesC1705 View Post
    Hi, and thanks for your reply,

    First up the code option is rather exciting - gonna have a go at that is a sec...

    With the first problem am I rite in saying you have divided by 3 because it's the greatest common factor?

    Now... I'm going to try coding my answer to the second problem:


    Regarding \frac{(4x^{3}y)^2}{x^5} = \frac{4x^{3}y \times 4x^{3}y}{x^5}<br />

    So effectively we are performing  \frac{4x^{3}y}{x^5} twice to acount for the fact that the top part is raised to the power of 2?

    So  \frac{4x^{3}y}{x^5} = \frac{4y}{x^2}

    Meaning \frac{4x^{3}y \times 4x^{3}y}{x^5} = \frac{16y^2}{x^4} ??


    Thanks in advance for your help - James

    For your first question. Yes. 3 is a factor of both 9 and 12, so you can divide both by 3.
    --------------------------------------

    Your second answer is incorrect!

    \frac{4x^{3}y \times 4x^{3}y}{x^5} = \frac{16 x^{6}y^2}{x^5}

    Now reduce x
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by harish21 View Post
    No.

    \frac{4x^{3}y \times 4x^{3}y}{x^5} = \frac{16 x^{6}y^2}{x^5}

    Now reduce x
    Okkaaayy so I get \frac{16 xy^2}{Nothing?} or is the answer just 16xy^2 ??
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  6. #6
    MHF Contributor harish21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JamesC1705 View Post
    Okkaaayy so I get \frac{16 xy^2}{Nothing?} or is the answer just 16xy^2 ??
    yes. but dont write nothing in the denominator!

    you get: \frac{16 xy^2}{1} = 16xy^2
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by harish21 View Post
    yes. but dont write nothing in the denominator!

    you get: \frac{16 xy^2}{1} = 16xy^2
    Yea I no I was joking - I was never gonna write nothing haha I thought it would be one... phew ok so tyvm just another 12 questions to go!

    Thanks for your help - James
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