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Math Help - Min/max value, is this an unusual way to phrase it?

  1. #1
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    Min/max value, is this an unusual way to phrase it?

    In my math 132 (college algebra and trigonometry) class when answering questions where we're supposed to identify the minimum/maximum, we're asked to identify where the min/max "occurs" (what they really want is the X value) and where the "value" is (the Y value).

    IMO this makes no sense, and I'm pretty annoyed because on a test I had no idea what they meant by "occurs" and "value" and answered in (x, y) form, and even though I got it right it was marked wrong. I tried explaining to my teacher that if you look at the terminology, "occurs at" and "value of" could both be logically applied to either the X value or the Y value, but she seems to think that what is meant is obvious and doesn't see a problem.

    Is the "occurs" and "value" thing a pretty common format and I should suck it up and memorize what they really want when they say that, or does it make as little sense as I think it does and I should ask for at least partial credit? Thanks! (I hope this is in the right spot!)
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by anywhere View Post
    In my math 132 (college algebra and trigonometry) class when answering questions where we're supposed to identify the minimum/maximum, we're asked to identify where the min/max "occurs" (what they really want is the X value) and where the "value" is (the Y value).

    IMO this makes no sense, and I'm pretty annoyed because on a test I had no idea what they meant by "occurs" and "value" and answered in (x, y) form, and even though I got it right it was marked wrong. I tried explaining to my teacher that if you look at the terminology, "occurs at" and "value of" could both be logically applied to either the X value or the Y value, but she seems to think that what is meant is obvious and doesn't see a problem.

    Is the "occurs" and "value" thing a pretty common format and I should suck it up and memorize what they really want when they say that, or does it make as little sense as I think it does and I should ask for at least partial credit? Thanks! (I hope this is in the right spot!)
    Hi anywhere,

    Let me give you one quick example. There are lots of others, but...

    Suppose you toss a projectile in the air. The quadratic model might be something like:

    h(t)=-16t^2+50t+4

    The height (h) is a function of time (t).

    Question: When does the maximum "occur" and what is the "value" at that time?

    You need to find the vertex which is your "maximum point".
    The x-coordinate of the vertex will tell you the time (t) when the maximum "occurred"
    and the y-coordinate will tell you the "value" or height (h) at that time (t).

    Maybe that helps. Hope so.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by anywhere View Post
    In my math 132 (college algebra and trigonometry) class when answering questions where we're supposed to identify the minimum/maximum, we're asked to identify where the min/max "occurs" (what they really want is the X value) and where the "value" is (the Y value).

    IMO this makes no sense, and I'm pretty annoyed because on a test I had no idea what they meant by "occurs" and "value" and answered in (x, y) form, and even though I got it right it was marked wrong. I tried explaining to my teacher that if you look at the terminology, "occurs at" and "value of" could both be logically applied to either the X value or the Y value, but she seems to think that what is meant is obvious and doesn't see a problem.

    Is the "occurs" and "value" thing a pretty common format and I should suck it up and memorize what they really want when they say that, or does it make as little sense as I think it does and I should ask for at least partial credit? Thanks! (I hope this is in the right spot!)
    Yes, that is pretty common usage and is perfectly good English. I have no idea why you would think it makes "little sense".
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