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Math Help - [SOLVED] Need help with a few questions

  1. #1
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    [SOLVED] Need help with a few questions

    2. For the simultaneous equation ax+by = a^2 + 2ab - b^2

    and bx+ay = a^2 + b^2

    I know there should be some kinda shortcut but I can't figure it out

    3. ABCD is a parallelogram with coordinates A(2,2), B(1,5,4), C(6,6)

    Find the coordinates of point of intersection of the diagonals?
    Last edited by NewtoMath; March 21st 2010 at 06:38 AM.
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  2. #2
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    Hello, NewtoMath!

    Solve by elimination: . \begin{array}{cccc} (a+b)x+cy &=& bc & [1]\\ (b+c)y +ax &=& \text{-}ab & [2]\end{array}
    Where did you mess up? . . . You didn't use Elimination.


    \begin{array}{cccc}<br />
\text{Multiply [1] by }a & a(a+b)x + acy &=& abc \\<br />
\text{Multiply [2] by }\text{-}c & \text{-}c(b+c)x - acy &=& abc \end{array}

    Add: . \bigg[a(a+b)-c(b+c)\bigg]x \;=\;2abc

    In the brackets, we have:
    . . a^2+ab - bc - c^2 \;=\;a^2-c^2 + ab-bc \;=\;(a-c)(a+c) + b(a-c) \;=\;(a-c)(a+b+c)

    So we have: . (a-c)(a+b+c)x \:=\:2abc \quad\Rightarrow\quad\boxed{ x \;=\;\frac{2abc}{(a-c)(a+b+c)}}

    Now substitute into [1] and solve for y.




    (2)\;\;\begin{array}{cccc}ax+by &=& a^2 + 2ab - b^2 & [1] \\bx+ay &=& a^2 + b^2 & [2] \end{array}

    Note: If a=b, the system has infinite solutions.
    . . . . . We will assume that a \neq b.



    \begin{array}{ccccc}<br />
\text{Multiply [1] by }a & a^2x + aby &=& a(a^2+2ab - b^2) \\<br />
\text{Multiply [2] by }\text{-}b & \text{-}b^2x - aby &=& \text{-}b(a^2+b^2) \end{array}


    Add: . (a^2-b^2)x \:=\:a^3 + 2a^2b - ab^2 - a^2b - b^3

    . . The right side is: . a^3 + a^2b - ab^2 - b^3 \;=\;a^2(a+b)-b^2(a+b) \;=\;(a+b)(a^2-b^2)


    So we have: . (a^2-b^2)x \;=\;(a+b)(a^2-b^2) \quad\Rightarrow\quad\boxed{ x \:=\:a+b}


    Substitute into [2]: . b(a+b) + ay \:=\:a^2+b^2 \quad\Rightarrow\quad ay \:=\:a^2 + b^2 - b(a+b)

    . . . . . ay \:=\:a^2-ab \:=\:a(a-b) \quad\Rightarrow\quad\boxed{ y \:=\:a-b}

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  3. #3
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    Hey thanks Soroban!

    Quote Originally Posted by Soroban View Post
    Hello, NewtoMath!

    Where did you mess up? . . . You didn't use Elimination.

    So why was my method wrong?

    (a+b)x+cy = bc AND (b+c)y +ax = -ab

    After removing the brackets the equations became...

    ax + cy + bx = bc

    ax + cy + by = -ab

    After subtracting should become bx-by = bc + ab no?
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  4. #4
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    2. For the simultaneous equation ax+by = a^2 + 2ab - b^2

    and bx+ay = a^2 + b^2

    I know there should be some kinda shortcut but I can't figure it out
    set both eq = 0 then set them equal to each other

    a^2+2 a b-b^2-a x-a b = b x+a y-a^2-b^2

    collect and factor
    a (2 a+b-x) = a y+b x

    however the only answer I see is a=0 and b=0
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigwave View Post
    however the only answer I see is a=0 and b=0[/FONT]
    Thanks bigwave. I'd really like to know what was wrong with my method tho so I don't repeat the mistake on an exam or something
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  6. #6
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    There was nothing "wrong" with your method except that there is no reason to do it! Whatever method you use to solve simultaneous equations, your objective is to eliminate one of the unknowns to get a single equation in a single unknown. Subtracting the two equations as you do does not eliminate anything.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by HallsofIvy View Post
    There was nothing "wrong" with your method except that there is no reason to do it! Whatever method you use to solve simultaneous equations, your objective is to eliminate one of the unknowns to get a single equation in a single unknown. Subtracting the two equations as you do does not eliminate anything.
    Ohh so I just turned the two equations into an equation with infinite solutions with x and y still being there.

    Thanks, that's all I needed to know regarding that.


    Would you know to then solve simultaneous equations with 3 or 4 variables?
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  8. #8
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    Can someone help me solve this equation?


    A parabola has x intercepts at -5 and -1 and passes through the point, 3,6 find the equation?

    If possible could I solve this with the y = a(x - h)2 + k formula?
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewtoMath View Post
    Can someone help me solve this equation?


    A parabola has x intercepts at -5 and -1 and passes through the point, 3,6 find the equation?

    If possible could I solve this with the y = a(x - h)2 + k formula?
    You could- though it is not the simplest way: saying that it has x-intercepts at -5 and -1 mean that the graph passes through (-5, 0) and (-1, 0). That, together with the fact that it passes through (3, 6) tells you that
    a) when x= -5, y= 0 so 0= a(-5- h)^2+ k
    b) when x= -1, y= 0 so 0= a(-1-h)^2+ k
    c) when x= 3, y= 6 so 6= a(3- h)^2+ k

    But, since none of the given points is the vertex, it would probably be simpler to use the general form y= ax^2+ bx+ c so that your equations are
    a) a(-5)^2+ b(-5)+ c= 0
    b) a(-1)^2+ b(-1)+ c= 0
    c) a(3)^2+ b(3)+ c= 0

    Simplest of all is to use the fact that since x= -5 and x= -1 make the function equal to 0, x-(-5)= x+ 5 and x-(-1)= x+ 1 must be factors:
    y= a(x+1)(x+5). Now set x= 3, y= 6 to get 6= a(3+1)(3+5) and solve for a.
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  10. #10
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    Thanks again Ivy, I think I'll be able to handle most parabola questions in my class with your methods

    This one is probably hard to explain w/o pen paper demonstration, but P & Q are points of intersection at y/2 + x/3 = 1 which becomes (0, 2), (3, 0). Gradient of QR is 1/2, where R is point x-coordinate 2a, a>0

    The question is find y-coord of R in terms of a but more importantly how do I draw this up to work from?
    Last edited by NewtoMath; March 21st 2010 at 06:28 AM.
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  11. #11
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    -
    Last edited by NewtoMath; March 21st 2010 at 06:28 AM.
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