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Math Help - Inverse & Composition Function Problem

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    Inverse & Composition Function Problem

    #1.)

    Given f(x) = x+3 and h(x) = 4x-4 <=> 4(x-1); find a function g(x) such that g(f(x)) = h(x) <=> g(x+3) = 4(x-1).

    I'm having trouble determining what g(x) should be - I don't know the method to determine this. If I was just asked to find any two functions whos composition resulted in h(x) I would have just decomposed h(x) as a(x) = 4x and b(x) = x-1 <=> a(b(x)) = 4(x-1) - but I'm obviously forced to use the inside function f(x) = x+3.

    #2.)

    Given f(x) = 3x + ln(x) find f^-1(x). In other words, solve for y in x = 3y + ln(y).

    I posted #2 in a previous thread, but I didn't really get the response I was looking for - I would appreciate the explanation for the answer if possible.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TaylorM0192 View Post
    #1.)

    Given f(x) = x+3 and h(x) = 4x-4 <=> 4(x-1); find a function g(x) such that g(f(x)) = h(x) <=> g(x+3) = 4(x-1).

    I'm having trouble determining what g(x) should be - I don't know the method to determine this. If I was just asked to find any two functions whos composition resulted in h(x) I would have just decomposed h(x) as a(x) = 4x and b(x) = x-1 <=> a(b(x)) = 4(x-1) - but I'm obviously forced to use the inside function f(x) = x+3.
    try g(x)=4x-8
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    Your g(x) does not result in 4x-4 when composed with f(x) = x+3 as the inner function. However, thank you for pointing me in the right direction, since it appears g(x) = 4x-16 works.

    But I still would like to know the steps to approach problems like these, since the method of trial and error in finding a correct function seems impractical later on.

    And the 2nd question is still giving me problems...I simply don't know what to do with the logarithm when the variable I am solving for is in two separate terms...
    Last edited by TaylorM0192; February 2nd 2010 at 07:41 PM.
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     g(x+3)= 4x-4

    Lets say g(x)=ax+b

     a(x+3)+b= 4x-4

    Expand

     ax+3a+b= 4x-4

    Equate coefficents

     ax= 4x \implies a=4

    and

     3a+b= -4 with a=4 gives  3\times 4+b= -4\implies b = -16

    g(x)= 4x-16
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    Thanks bud, appreciate the explanation.

    Any suggestions on the 2nd problem? I started by isolating the natural logarithm, them setting each term as an exponent with base 'e' (thus isolating 1 'y' by itself). But then the other 'y' becomes an exponent which can only be isolated by going back to the original equation and taking the natural logarithm of both sides...Whatever I try, I end up with ugly terms -
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    I've gotten to this point in trying to find the inverse for f(x)=ln(x)+3x:


    x=ln(y)+3y
    ln(y)=x-3y
    y=e^{x-3y}



    Is it even possible to isolate 'y' to a single term to create an inverse function?

    The ultimate question is, what is f^{-1}(3) of f(x)=ln(x)+3x.

    Thanks ...
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    Quote Originally Posted by TaylorM0192 View Post

    The ultimate question is, what is f^{-1}(3) of f(x)=ln(x)+3x.

    Thanks ...
    Thats better, giving a bit more information like that makes life easier.

    consider f(x)=\ln(x)+3x

    by inspection f(1)=\ln(1)+3\times 1 = 0+3=3

    so we can say f^{-1}(3)= 1
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