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Math Help - Find three consecutive numbers that add up to these numbers

  1. #1
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    Find three consecutive numbers that add up to these numbers

    for example: 141+142+143 add up to 426

    Now what I need to do is explain the procedure (how did I get this kind of answer etc.). Sorry I really don't know how to find the formula..

    4 consecutive, even numbers that add up to 1172
    5 ~ that add up to 1172
    Last edited by Julian.Ignacio; September 23rd 2009 at 10:51 AM. Reason: Edit:I DO know the answer but...I don't know how to express it...
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  2. #2
    A riddle wrapped in an enigma
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    Quote Originally Posted by Julian.Ignacio View Post
    for example: 141+142+143 add up to 426

    Now what I need to do is explain the procedure (how did I get this kind of answer etc.). Sorry I really don't know how to find the formula..

    4 consecutive, even numbers that add up to 1172
    5 ~ that add up to 1172
    Hi Julian,

    Consecutive integers can be defined as x, x + 1, x + 2, x + 3, etc., where x is an integer.

    Consecutive even integers can be defined as x, x + 2, x + 4, x + 6, etc., where x is an even integer.



    In your first problem, first define your numbers.

    Let x = 1st even number

    Let x + 2 = 2nd even number

    Let x + 4 = 3rd even number

    Let x + 6 = 4th even number

    Now add them to obtain the desired sum.

    x + x + 2 + x + 4 + x + 6 = 1172

    Solve for x, and then determine the 2nd, 3rd and 4th even numbers.

    The second part of your question is vague. There are no 5 consecutive even integers that add up to 1172.

    x + x + 2 + x + 4 + x + 6 + x + 8 =1172

    In the above equation, x is not an integer.
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  3. #3
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    YOu're right, the last one IS impossible...is putting parentheses useless in this calculation? And why?
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  4. #4
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    The additive identity does not require them. Mathematically:

    a+(b+c) = (a+b)+c = b+(a+c) = a+b+c

    You can still put them in if you wish to make the working clearer though
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