Results 1 to 11 of 11

Math Help - fraction hard!

  1. #1
    Super Member
    Joined
    Oct 2008
    From
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    897

    fraction hard!

    hi, i need to know what this is

    fraction hard!-untitled.jpg

    i know i need to change tham to a top heavey fraction but i don't know how to do it, please could you show me what to do with workings out!!
    Last edited by andyboy179; September 11th 2009 at 06:45 AM.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    46
    The question isn't very clear in my opinion. Can you make it neater? :O
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Joined
    Oct 2008
    From
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    897
    sorry i just saw that, it was ok while i was writing it, sorry again
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    46
    Yes, it would be wise to convert these "mixed fractions" to "top heavy fractions" or "proper fractions" as they're otherwise called!

    To do this, multiply the number in front of the fraction by the denominator and then add the numerator.

    eg: 4\frac{3}{2}
    Step 1: Multiply the number in front by the denominator (The number on the bottom of the fraction which happens to equal 2 in this example):
    4*2=8
    Step 2: Add this number to the numerator of the fraction (The number on the top which happens to be 3 in this example):
    8+3=11
    Step 3: Place this new number (11) over the original denominator (number at the bottom) which is 2:
    \frac{11}{2}

    Voila! There is a mixed fraction converted to a "top heavy fraction"

    Try doing the question yourself following these steps! Otherwise, I'm happy to help further
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Joined
    Oct 2008
    From
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    897
    Quote Originally Posted by Finley View Post
    Yes, it would be wise to convert these "mixed fractions" to "top heavy fractions" or "proper fractions" as they're otherwise called!

    To do this, multiply the number in front of the fraction by the denominator and then add the numerator.

    eg: 4\frac{3}{2}
    Step 1: Multiply the number in front by the denominator (The number on the bottom of the fraction which happens to equal 2 in this example):
    4*2=8
    Step 2: Add this number to the numerator of the fraction (The number on the top which happens to be 3 in this example):
    8+3=11
    Step 3: Place this new number (11) over the original denominator (number at the bottom) which is 2:
    \frac{11}{2}

    Voila! There is a mixed fraction converted to a "top heavy fraction"

    Try doing the question yourself following these steps! Otherwise, I'm happy to help further

    thanks alot for that!
    so would mine be:
    \frac{22}{7} - \frac{11}{5} ?

    if so would the answer be:
    \frac{11}{2}
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    46
    My post was merely an example, the answer didn't apply to your question!!

    However, the first part of your answer is entirely correct!
    \frac{22}{7} - \frac{11}{5}

    However, we need to go a few steps further to get the final answer!!

    Firstly, can you subtract two fractions that don't have a common denominator?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Joined
    Oct 2008
    From
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    897
    Quote Originally Posted by Finley View Post
    My post was merely an example, the answer didn't apply to your question!!

    However, the first part of your answer is entirely correct!
    \frac{22}{7} - \frac{11}{5}

    However, we need to go a few steps further to get the final answer!!

    Firstly, can you subtract two fractions that don't have a common denominator?

    would it be \frac{11}{2} ????

    if not, how do i get the answer?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    46
    No, the answer is not \frac{11}{2}

    To simplify we need to find the LOWEST COMMON DENOMINATOR of the two fractions. In other words, we need the two BOTTOM NUMBERS of the fractions to be THE SAME.

    The easiest way to find a COMMON DENOMINATOR is to multiply the two DENOMINATORS (bottom numbers) together:

    Aka. 7*5=CD
    Therefore Common Denominator = 35

    Therefore,
    \frac{110}{35}-\frac{77}{35}

    What I've done is place the original numerators (22 and 11) over the COMMON DENOMINATOR. What we do to the bottom, we must do to the top (this keeps the ratio even).

    In other words, to get from 7 (the denominator in the first fraction)) to 35 we needed to multiply it by 5! To get from 5 (the denominator in the second fraction) to 35 we needed to multiply it by 7!

    What we do to the bottom, we do to the top!!

    Keeping it short,
    22*5 = 110 (New numerator for first fraction)
    11*7 = 77

    Now to simplify \frac{110}{35}-\frac{77}{35}!

    Deal with the numerators only:
    110-77 = 33

    Place the new numerator over the common denominator (35):
    33/35

    33/35 Can't be simplified any further, hence this is the answer!

    Answer: \frac{33}{35}
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Joined
    Oct 2008
    From
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    897
    i just looked in my book on how to do it, i know what the answer is now!
    it would be:
    \frac{33}{35}
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Joined
    Oct 2008
    From
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    897
    Quote Originally Posted by Finley View Post
    No, the answer is not \frac{11}{2}

    To simplify we need to find the LOWEST COMMON DENOMINATOR of the two fractions. In other words, we need the two BOTTOM NUMBERS of the fractions to be THE SAME.

    The easiest way to find a COMMON DENOMINATOR is to multiply the two DENOMINATORS (bottom numbers) together:

    Aka. 7*5=CD
    Therefore Common Denominator = 35

    Therefore,
    \frac{110}{35}-\frac{77}{35}

    What I've done is place the original numerators (22 and 11) over the LOWEST COMMON DENOMINATOR. What we do to the bottom, we must do to the top (this keeps the ratio even).

    In other words, to get from 7 (the denominator in the first fraction)) to 35 we needed to multiply it by 5! To get from 5 (the denominator in the second fraction) to 35 we needed to multiply it by 7!

    What we do to the bottom, we do to the top!!

    Keeping it short,
    22*5 = 110 (New numerator for first fraction)
    11*7 = 77

    Now to simplify \frac{110}{35}-\frac{77}{35}!

    Deal with the numerators only:
    110-77 = 33

    Place the new numerator over the new common denominator (35):
    33/35

    33/35 Can't be simplified any further, hence this is the answer!

    Answer: \frac{33}{35}

    thanks, i just posted because i must have been writing it up when u posted, thanks alot for the help
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  11. #11
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    46
    No problem!! Hopefully it's beginning to make more sense Grappling the logic behind fractions will help enormously in later mathematics.

    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. hard fraction!
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: February 19th 2011, 01:51 AM
  2. hard fraction
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: December 10th 2010, 09:03 AM
  3. hard fraction
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 62
    Last Post: November 23rd 2010, 07:08 AM
  4. hard fraction
    Posted in the Math Topics Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: February 5th 2010, 07:04 AM
  5. really hard fraction question HELP
    Posted in the Math Topics Forum
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: December 18th 2009, 08:02 AM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum