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Math Help - Weights

  1. #1
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    Weights

    Hello all.

    I'm trying to work out the total weight of a a bundle of pipe that in total is 4200 feet long, each joint is 40 foot long, so this means that I have 105 joints of pipe. The diameter is 13 3/8" and it's 54.5 pounds per foot. Any ideas?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by travellingscotsman View Post
    Hello all.

    I'm trying to work out the total weight of a a bundle of pipe that in total is 4200 feet long, each joint is 40 foot long, so this means that I have 105 joints of pipe. The diameter is 13 3/8" and it's 54.5 pounds per foot. Any ideas?
    Since you have "pounds per foot" the diameter is not relevant. You have 4200 feet of pipe at 54.5 pounds per foot: the total weight is (4200)(54.5)= 228900 pounds or 228900/2000= 114.45 tons.

    I hope you are not hoping to lift that yourself!
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by travellingscotsman View Post
    Hello all.

    I'm trying to work out the total weight of a a bundle of pipe that in total is 4200 feet long, each joint is 40 foot long, so this means that I have 105 joints of pipe. The diameter is 13 3/8" and it's 54.5 pounds per foot. Any ideas?
    Yes.

    You state that you have 4200 feet of pipe that weighs 54.5 pound per foot.
    And that you are trying to work out the total weight of this bundle of pipe.
    .
    Step 1:
    If you had ONLY 1 foot of pipe, how much would 1 foot of pipe weigh?
    Your answer should be 54.5 pounds.
    .
    Step 2:
    If you had 2 (two) feet of pipe, how much would 2 feet of pipe weigh?
    You should be able to provide that answer. (Hint: 54.5+54.5 = 109)
    .
    Step 3:
    If you had 3 feet of pipe, how much would 3 feet of pipe weigh?
    Hint:  3 \times 54.5 = 163.5
    .
    Step 4:
    If you had 4 feet of pipe, how much would 4 feet of pipe weigh?
    No hints here. You should be able to provide the answer.

    At this point you should see a pattern developing.
    You will need to do this step business 4200 more times before the answer for the total weight appears.

    DO NOT SKIP ANY INTERMEDIATE STEPS!
    .
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