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Math Help - Approximation methods

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Approximation methods

    Hi,
    I'm a bit confused about when do you know to use the Maclaurin Polynomial Approximation versus the Least Squares cubic approximation to solve a problem.. Can someone please explain to me the difference?

    All I'm understanding is that both are used to reduce the difference between the actual and predicted value

    Thank you!!
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  2. #2
    Grand Panjandrum
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    Quote Originally Posted by gconfused View Post
    Hi,
    I'm a bit confused about when do you know to use the Maclaurin Polynomial Approximation versus the Least Squares cubic approximation to solve a problem.. Can someone please explain to me the difference?

    All I'm understanding is that both are used to reduce the difference between the actual and predicted value

    Thank you!!
    In what context?

    A maclaurin/Taylor polynomial approximates a known function, a least squares approximation is used to fit a curve to data (unless you are looking at a least squares cubic approx to a known function when the cubic will be an approximation "best" over an interval)

    CB
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