Results 1 to 4 of 4

Math Help - Normal approximation

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Joined
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19

    Normal approximation

    An orchard owner knows that he'll have to use about 8% of the apples he harvests for cider because they will have bruises or blemishes. He expects a tree to produce about 500 apples. Using the normal approximation to the binomial, find the probability the orchard owner will obtain at most 25 cider apples from the 500.

    I think i know where to start: P(x< or equal to 25) but I am completely stuck beyond this point. I have looked at all the other models I have in regards to proportions and square roots of npq and I cannot figure this one out. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Flow Master
    mr fantastic's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2007
    From
    Zeitgeist
    Posts
    16,948
    Thanks
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by cechmanek32 View Post
    An orchard owner knows that he'll have to use about 8% of the apples he harvests for cider because they will have bruises or blemishes. He expects a tree to produce about 500 apples. Using the normal approximation to the binomial, find the probability the orchard owner will obtain at most 25 cider apples from the 500.

    I think i know where to start: P(x< or equal to 25) but I am completely stuck beyond this point. I have looked at all the other models I have in regards to proportions and square roots of npq and I cannot figure this one out. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
    Asked by another member here: http://www.mathhelpforum.com/math-he...-binomial.html

    and you should answer the same questions that I asked there.

    The approach is actually the same as the one I showed you here: http://www.mathhelpforum.com/math-he...t-theorem.html
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Newbie
    Joined
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19
    Thanks for all the help but I think this is just a lost cause for me. I have no idea which of the numbers I found to plug in and where to plug them into the equation of (x<7). Thanks anyway for trying.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Flow Master
    mr fantastic's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2007
    From
    Zeitgeist
    Posts
    16,948
    Thanks
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by cechmanek32 View Post
    Thanks for all the help but I think this is just a lost cause for me. I have no idea which of the numbers I found to plug in and where to plug them into the equation of (x<7). Thanks anyway for trying.
    But can you answer the questions I asked!? State the normal approximation to the binomial distribution and state the conditions for its use to be valid.

    Let X be the random variable number of bruised apples.

    X ~ Binomial(n = 500, p = 0.08).

    Calculate \Pr(X \leq 25).

    You can use the normal approximation to the binomial distribution.

    Can you state this approximation?
    Can you state why it can be used? (That is, what are the conditions that have to be met?)
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. the normal approximation
    Posted in the Statistics Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: October 23rd 2010, 06:09 AM
  2. Normal approximation
    Posted in the Statistics Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 21st 2009, 04:08 PM
  3. SD and Normal Approximation-2
    Posted in the Advanced Statistics Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: November 3rd 2008, 12:01 PM
  4. Normal approximation
    Posted in the Advanced Statistics Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 1st 2008, 09:29 PM
  5. SD and Normal Approximation
    Posted in the Advanced Statistics Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 1st 2008, 09:12 PM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum