Results 1 to 2 of 2

Math Help - Normal approximation

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Joined
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    3

    Normal approximation

    Could someone help me solve this please

    Suppose that a particular aircraft flight has 282 passenger seats in the aircraft, and that passengers will turn up independently of each other to take the flight with probability p. The airline overbooks the flight with excess of 20 more passengers than there are seats in the aircraft. Using a normal approximation, what is the value of p such that the probability that the flight is overbooked is equal to 0.01?

    Do you use X~Bin(282,p) or X~Bin(302,p) and then P(x>282) or P(282<X<302)?
    Last edited by Jpmps; November 2nd 2008 at 12:30 AM.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Grand Panjandrum
    Joined
    Nov 2005
    From
    someplace
    Posts
    14,972
    Thanks
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Jpmps View Post
    Could someone help me solve this please

    Suppose that a particular aircraft flight has 282 passenger seats in the aircraft, and that passengers will turn up independently of each other to take the flight with probability p. The airline overbooks the flight with excess of 20 more passengers than there are seats in the aircraft. Using a normal approximation, what is the value of p such that the probability that the flight is overbooked is equal to 0.01?

    Do you use X~Bin(282,p) or X~Bin(302,p) and then P(x>282) or P(282<X<302)?
    The probability that the plane is overbooked is pr(N> 282) where N\sim B(302,p) The normal approximation is that:

     <br />
X \sim N(302p, 302p(1-p))<br />

    and the required probability using this approximation is that pr(X>282.5)

    CB
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. the normal approximation
    Posted in the Statistics Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: October 23rd 2010, 05:09 AM
  2. Normal approximation
    Posted in the Statistics Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 21st 2009, 03:08 PM
  3. SD and Normal Approximation-2
    Posted in the Advanced Statistics Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: November 3rd 2008, 11:01 AM
  4. Normal approximation
    Posted in the Advanced Statistics Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 1st 2008, 08:29 PM
  5. SD and Normal Approximation
    Posted in the Advanced Statistics Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 1st 2008, 08:12 PM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum