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Math Help - Error Analysis

  1. #1
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    Error Analysis

    I'm really unsure where to post this so sorry if this is the wrong section, anyways:

    The error part of my physics labs have been takin up a lot of time lately. Anyways, say I have 10 numbers for time measurements like 3.53 s, 5.32 s, 3.57 s, 4.89 s, 3.24 s, etc...
    and my reaction time is say +/- 0.20 s. I want to average these 10 values out but I have to associate an error reading like with the final value so for example my final value would like like : avg time = 3.23 +/- 0.13 s.

    ok to rephrase it, say I find my standard deviation to be 0.08947 using Excel. My reaction time is 0.20 s and my average value is 1.41 s. How would I incorporate/propogate the rxn time and stnd deviation to find the final +/- error value?

    -thanks
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  2. #2
    Grand Panjandrum
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    Quote Originally Posted by SportfreundeKeaneKent View Post
    I'm really unsure where to post this so sorry if this is the wrong section, anyways:

    The error part of my physics labs have been takin up a lot of time lately. Anyways, say I have 10 numbers for time measurements like 3.53 s, 5.32 s, 3.57 s, 4.89 s, 3.24 s, etc...
    and my reaction time is say +/- 0.20 s. I want to average these 10 values out but I have to associate an error reading like with the final value so for example my final value would like like : avg time = 3.23 +/- 0.13 s.

    ok to rephrase it, say I find my standard deviation to be 0.08947 using Excel. My reaction time is 0.20 s and my average value is 1.41 s. How would I incorporate/propogate the rxn time and stnd deviation to find the final +/- error value?

    -thanks
    An error of the form \pm \; x often denotes \pm\; 3 \sigma errors, though equally
    often \pm\; 2 \sigma errors. Without further information about what \pm \; 0.2s
    means we cannot do much more.

    RonL
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  3. #3
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    use the propogation of errors formula
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