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Math Help - Probability question using an "unfair" coin

  1. #1
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    Probability question using an "unfair" coin

    An "unfair" coin has a heads side which weighs two and one-half times heavier than the tails side. If you toss this unfair coin 100 times, how many of those times would you expect to see heads? Explain why.

    Design a simulation that will approximate this result. Explain your experimental design and results.
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    Senior Member MaxJasper's Avatar
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    Re: Probability question using an "unfair" coin

    p(head)=1/3.5
    Trials n=100
    Expected mean heads = n*p=28
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    Re: Probability question using an "unfair" coin

    Hey jthomp18.

    The real question is how this assumption translates into a proportion value for getting a heads (or a tails).

    Given this is a physics question type question, it means that the centre of mass is skewed towards one side but this one factor doesn't capture how the dynamics are affected of the coin toss. It's not going to simply be that the proportion of the weight will affect the proportion of the success easily, even though it's an "easy assumption to make".

    What have you tried in this question? Are you doing physics or engineering? Do you have access to some kind of simulation program?
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