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Math Help - probablity with normal distribution

  1. #1
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    probablity with normal distribution

    If a baseball player's batting average is 0.260 (26%), find the probability that the player will get at most 21 hits in 100 times at bat.
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  2. #2
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    Hello, Gracy!

    Who assigned this problem? .Professor deSade?


    If a baseball player's batting average is 0.260 (26%),
    find the probability that the player will get at most 21 hits in 100 times at bat.
    Here's the game plan.
    Calculate the probabilities of 0 hits, 1 hit, 2 hits, 3 hits, . . . 21 hits
    . . and add them.


    Here's the list to add . . .

    0 hits: . C(100,0)0.26)^0(0.74)^100
    1 hit: . .C(100,1)(0.26)^1(0.74)^99
    2 hits: . C(100,2)(0.26)^2(0.74)^98
    3 hits: . C(100,3)(0.26)^3(0.74)^97
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    21 hits: .C(100,21)(0.26)^21(0.74)^79



    I'll wait in the car . . .
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soroban View Post
    Hello, Gracy!

    Who assigned this problem? .Professor deSade?


    Here's the game plan.
    Calculate the probabilities of 0 hits, 1 hit, 2 hits, 3 hits, . . . 21 hits
    . . and add them.


    Here's the list to add . . .

    0 hits: . C(100,0)0.26)^0(0.74)^100
    1 hit: . .C(100,1)(0.26)^1(0.74)^99
    2 hits: . C(100,2)(0.26)^2(0.74)^98
    3 hits: . C(100,3)(0.26)^3(0.74)^97
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    21 hits: .C(100,21)(0.26)^21(0.74)^79



    I'll wait in the car . . .
    I would have done the same solution as you. But I believe there is an approximation, called the "Normal Distribution". I know that there is a much faster way of doing this, and I am sure CaptainBlank[ will do that sometime later. I am just not sure how it works, probability is not where I am good.
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