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Math Help - Percentiles of a continuous pdf

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    Percentiles of a continuous pdf

    An insurer.s annual weather-related loss, X, is a random variable with density function
    1. f(x) ={2.5(200)^2:5/x^3.5 for x > 200
    0 otherwise
    Calculate the difference between the 25th and 75th percentiles of X.
    Last edited by mr fantastic; October 20th 2009 at 02:46 PM. Reason: Moved from original thread and re-titled
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    Quote Originally Posted by affelix View Post
    An insurer.s annual weather-related loss, X, is a random variable with density function
    1. f(x) ={2.5(200)^2:5/x^3.5 for x > 200 Mr F say: This function requires clarification. What does the full colon : mean. Do you mean 2.5(200)^(2.5/x^3.5)?
    0 otherwise
    Calculate the difference between the 25th and 75th percentiles of X.
    Let the 25th percentile be a and the 75th percentile be b. Calculate b - a where

    \Pr(X < a) = 0.25 and \Pr(X < b) = 0.75

    (it's assumed that you know how to calculate probabilities using a pdf).

    If you need more help, please show all you've done and state where you get stuck.
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