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Math Help - raising complex numbers to complex exponents?

  1. #1
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    raising complex numbers to complex exponents?

    Is it possible to calculate something like (a + bi)^{c+di}?

    I recall reading somewhere that i^i is calculable (I think its a real number), so I was pondering whether or not this was true for complex numbers in general?
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamix View Post
    Is it possible to calculate something like (a + bi)^{c+di}?

    I recall reading somewhere that i^i is calculable (I think its a real number), so I was pondering whether or not this was true for complex numbers in general?
    Yes.

    z^{\alpha}=e^{\alpha\ln(z)}
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    Ah I think I just figured it out...

    First you put the bottom number into polar coordinates Re^{i0}. Then you break up the exponent so we have the following:

    (Re^{i0})^c \cdot (Re^{i0})^{di} = R \cdot (cos(0c) + isin(0c)) \cdot ( Re^{-d0}) = R^2 \cdot e^{-d0} \cdot ( cos(0c) + isin(0c))
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    Yes you can. It's no simple task, but it requries you write the complex number in its exponential-polar form.

    Complex Exponentiation -- from Wolfram MathWorld
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    The Wolfram link really helped me understand what was being said in the other thread (which I couldn't follow).
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamix View Post
    The Wolfram link really helped me understand what was being said in the other thread (which I couldn't follow).
    I think it is easier to use the e^{aLn(z)}
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwsmith View Post
    I think it is easier to use the e^{aLn(z)}
    There's no such thing as \displaystyle \ln{z}, you can only take a natural logarithm of positive real numbers.

    However, \displaystyle \log{z} = \ln{|z|} + i\arg{z} is acceptable. It is also needed to be able to write the answer explicitly in terms of its real and imaginary parts.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prove It View Post
    There's no such thing as \displaystyle \ln{z}, you can only take a natural logarithm of positive real numbers.

    However, \displaystyle \log{z} = \ln{|z|} + i\arg{z} is acceptable. It is also needed to be able to write the answer explicitly in terms of its real and imaginary parts.
    \log(z)=\log_e(z)=\text{Ln}(z)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prove It View Post
    There's no such thing as \displaystyle \ln{z}, you can only take a natural logarithm of positive real numbers.

    However, \displaystyle \log{z} = \ln{|z|} + i\arg{z} is acceptable. It is also needed to be able to write the answer explicitly in terms of its real and imaginary parts.
    Rubbish, you just did or rather discovered its extension (note it is multi-valued, and we will need that if we are going to use it to take powers of complex numbers).

    CB
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