Results 1 to 4 of 4

Math Help - Who do I talk to?

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Joined
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3

    Who do I talk to?

    I have spent a couple of years formulating the following theory:

    Rounding Theory

    There exists a highly sophisticated mathematical algorithm that may require sets of algorithms that the brain uses to convert millions and/or billions of pieces of sensory data to a single concept. (e.g. Grandma) This algorithm requires interpreting data from multiple dimensions and simplifying them down to less dimensions in a rounding process. Binary is obviously one of the languages that the brain uses but it can't be assumed that binary is the only language used in the algorithm as languages that involve more than 2 dimensions may have significant advantages for complex calculations. Cracking the code of how the brain interprets sensory data into concepts may help us understand great mysteries of the universe.

    The code involves the following attributes:

    * Number of data points
    * Number of dimensions to the data
    * Number of sets of algorithms
    * Number of numerical languages
    * Existing numerical languages that the brain uses


    It's such an abstract theory, I don't know who to talk to about it. I have done some initial modelling on the theory but it seems to earlier to get caught up in the mathematics but rather focus on what field of study would be most interested on building on it.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Grand Panjandrum
    Joined
    Nov 2005
    From
    someplace
    Posts
    14,972
    Thanks
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Vurg View Post
    I have spent a couple of years formulating the following theory:

    Rounding Theory

    There exists a highly sophisticated mathematical algorithm that may require sets of algorithms that the brain uses to convert millions and/or billions of pieces of sensory data to a single concept. (e.g. Grandma) This algorithm requires interpreting data from multiple dimensions and simplifying them down to less dimensions in a rounding process. Binary is obviously one of the languages that the brain uses but it can't be assumed that binary is the only language used in the algorithm as languages that involve more than 2 dimensions may have significant advantages for complex calculations. Cracking the code of how the brain interprets sensory data into concepts may help us understand great mysteries of the universe.

    The code involves the following attributes:

    * Number of data points
    * Number of dimensions to the data
    * Number of sets of algorithms
    * Number of numerical languages
    * Existing numerical languages that the brain uses


    It's such an abstract theory, I don't know who to talk to about it. I have done some initial modelling on the theory but it seems to earlier to get caught up in the mathematics but rather focus on what field of study would be most interested on building on it.
    What makes you think that the brain uses algorithms?

    CB
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Newbie
    Joined
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3
    A large percentage of Anatomists agree that the most simple form of sensory data exists in binary format. Our way of existing in the world also seems to require some sort of binary definition of concepts in order to work with them. (e.g. Something is Grandma or it isn't) A concept however usually consists of huge quantities of data to exist. It seems very logical to me that a system must be required to convert the huge quantity of data to one concept. A concept like "Grandma" is both 0 Dimensional and multi-dimensional. For functional purposes there is a 0 Dimensional definition of Grandma to define something as being Grandma or not. However, there is a vast understanding over a vast number of dimensions that defines Grandma. Hence, there must be a logical method in converting the huge amount of sensory data associated with Grandma to an awareness of Grandma's presence.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Grand Panjandrum
    Joined
    Nov 2005
    From
    someplace
    Posts
    14,972
    Thanks
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Vurg View Post
    A large percentage of Anatomists agree that the most simple form of sensory data exists in binary format.
    No that is not how neural signals work (a neuron may fire or not but its on/off status is not how the signal is encoded)

    Our way of existing in the world also seems to require some sort of binary definition of concepts in order to work with them. (e.g. Something is Grandma or it isn't)
    Since you have posted question elsewhere on fuzzy-logic, or fuzzy set theory, you know that in all probability this is not so.

    A concept however usually consists of huge quantities of data to exist. It seems very logical to me that a system must be required to convert the huge quantity of data to one concept. A concept like "Grandma" is both 0 Dimensional and multi-dimensional. For functional purposes there is a 0 Dimensional definition of Grandma to define something as being Grandma or not. However, there is a vast understanding over a vast number of dimensions that defines Grandma. Hence, there must be a logical method in converting the huge amount of sensory data associated with Grandma to an awareness of Grandma's presence.
    This sounds like waffley gobbledygook to me.

    But it seems that we should redirect you to sites dealing with the science of mind and/or AI (you will need to google for them). I don't think MHF is a suitable place to discuss this.

    CB
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Alphametric Puzzle: talk+talk+all=noise
    Posted in the Math Puzzles Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: May 19th 2011, 11:19 AM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum