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Math Help - Projectile problem

  1. #1
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    Projectile problem

    Hey,

    Can anybody offer any assistance with the following problem please?

    A projectile is shot, in windy conditions, with initial speed v at an angle of 60 degrees from the ground. Because of the wind, which blows horizontally, the projectile is subject to a viscosity force, in the direction of the wind, of the form Fv = -c.vx (where vx is the component of the velocity of the projectile in the horizontal direction and c is a constant).

    [nb. In Fv = -c.vx, the first v and x are subscript. Hope the question is clear. I don't how to type subscript characters.]

    Determine the position of the projectile, x(t) and y(t), for t ≥ 0 and compute the distance at which the projectile lands.

    I'd be very grateful for any help with this.

    Thanks
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackiemoon View Post
    Hey,

    Can anybody offer any assistance with the following problem please?

    A projectile is shot, in windy conditions, with initial speed v at an angle of 60 degrees from the ground. Because of the wind, which blows horizontally, the projectile is subject to a viscosity force, in the direction of the wind, of the form Fv = -c.vx (where vx is the component of the velocity of the projectile in the horizontal direction and c is a constant).

    [nb. In Fv = -c.vx, the first v and x are subscript. Hope the question is clear. I don't how to type subscript characters.]

    Determine the position of the projectile, x(t) and y(t), for t ≥ 0 and compute the distance at which the projectile lands.

    I'd be very grateful for any help with this.

    Thanks
    F = -cv_x

    m\frac{dv_x}{dt} = -cv_x

    \frac{dv_x}{dt} = -\frac{c}{m}v_x

    let \frac{c}{m} = k ...

    \frac{dv_x}{dt} = -kv_x

    v_x = v_{xo}e^{-kt}<br />

    you also know that v_{xo} = v_o\cos(60) = \frac{v_o}{2}
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