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Math Help - It is a Question!

  1. #1
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    Unhappy It is a Question!

    Explain the physics of the generation of sound for a musical instrument of your choice.
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  2. #2
    Forum Admin topsquark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Celia
    Explain the physics of the generation of sound for a musical instrument of your choice.
    Probably the simplest choice would be a stringed instrument.

    Briefly: The sound is produced by the vibration of a string which vibrates (more or less) as a standing wave. This vibration disturbs the air molecules near the string, which creates a sound wave.

    -Dan
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Celia
    Explain the physics of the generation of sound for a musical instrument of your choice.

    You blow in here . . . the music goes round 'n round . . .

    [Bad joke! .Bad! .Go to your room!]
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  4. #4
    Grand Panjandrum
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    Quote Originally Posted by topsquark
    Probably the simplest choice would be a stringed instrument.

    Briefly: The sound is produced by the vibration of a string which vibrates (more or less) as a standing wave. This vibration disturbs the air molecules near the string, which creates a sound wave.

    -Dan
    The string itself is too small to produce much sound so it has to be connected
    to a large object (via a/the bridge?) which moved more air when it vibrates
    and so more sound, which in its turn may stimulate a cavity with lots of
    resonances to produce even more sound.

    RonL
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