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Math Help - tennis ball example/coefficient of restitution

  1. #16
    Super Member malaygoel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by topsquark
    Yes. According to CaptainBlack (and I no longer have any reason to doubt his definiton) the coefficient of restitution is a ratio between the final and initial "vertical" components of the velocity. (Vertical referring to a normal to the surface of impact.)

    -Dan
    Thanks.
    It was never taught in school.

    Malay
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  2. #17
    Grand Panjandrum
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    []quote=topsquark]
    Quote Originally Posted by malaygoel
    I haven't performed the experiment, but let me know the answer.

    Malay
    The point is, using my definition, the ball would eventually stop even over a frictionless surface. (e is always less than 1 in reality) If the ball had a horizontal component of velocity Netwon's 1st says it should always be in motion. A contradiction, so my definition can't be correct.

    -Dan
    [/quote]

    It was not just a thought experiment, I did actually go out and perform
    it. I have also been contemplating videoing it and analysing the frames of
    the video to try measuring the coefficient .

    RonL
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