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Math Help - transformer current in primary coil

  1. #1
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    transformer current in primary coil

    A step-down transformer (turns ratio = 1:8) is used with an electric train to reduce the voltage from the wall receptacle to a value needed to operate the train. When the train is running, the current in the secondary coil is 1.9 A.

    What is the current in the primary coil?
    in Amperes


    if the formula for current in the secondary coil is: A * (ratio of primary coil/secondary coil) = current

    then why can't we just use A* 1/8 = 1.9

    multiply by 8 and get the amps for the first coil which is 15.2 A
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcmango View Post
    A step-down transformer (turns ratio = 1:8) is used with an electric train to reduce the voltage from the wall receptacle to a value needed to operate the train. When the train is running, the current in the secondary coil is 1.9 A.

    What is the current in the primary coil?
    in Amperes
    if the formula for current in the secondary coil is: A * (ratio of primary coil/secondary coil) = current

    then why can't we just use A* 1/8 = 1.9
    multiply by 8 and get the amps for the first coil which is 15.2 A
    I hope this reply doesn't come too late.

    n_p, n_s are the turns in the primary or secondary coils.
    U_p, U_s are the voltages in the primary or secondary coils.
    I_p, I_s are the currents in the primary or secondary coils.
    E_p, E_s are the electrical energies in the primary or secondary coils.

    Then you know:

    \frac{U_p}{U_s}= \frac{n_p}{n_s}

    You know by the law of conservation of energy that

    E_p = E_s . That means:

    U_p \cdot I_p = U_s \cdot I_s~\iff~\frac{U_p}{U_s} = \frac{I_s}{I_p}~\iff~ \frac{n_p}{n_s} = \frac{I_s}{I_p} .

    With your problem:

    \frac{n_p}{n_s} = \frac{8}{1} . And therefore you get:

    \frac{8}{1} = \frac{I_s}{I_p}~\implies~I_s = \frac{8}{1} \cdot I_p . Plug i the value you know and solve for I_p.

    I've got I_p = 0.2375\ A
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  3. #3
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    Okay, I see that I had my ratio incorrect, should be the reciprocal of what I have there. 8/1 instead of the other way i had it. Also, the Current I was using was correct.

    Thanks for the help, I knew I was close, and it wasn't major.

    Also, I got it in time to help me, thanks very much for the explanation!
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