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Thread: Practical Math

  1. #1
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    Practical Math

    Approximately 7% of the American population has diabetes.
    Within this group, 14.6 million are diagnosed, while 6.2 million are undiagnosed.
    (Source: The National Diabetes Education Program) What percent of
    Americans with diabetes have not been diagnosed with the disease? Round to the
    nearest tenth of a percent.


    This should be really easy but i really suck at math
    Last edited by racertaz01; Aug 30th 2017 at 11:16 PM.
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  2. #2
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    Re: Practical Math

    ok the first line is a red herring, you can ignore it.

    You need to figure out

    a) how many Americans have diabetetes

    b) what percent of that total is 6.2 million, i.e. the number of undiagnosed cases.

    the total is just the sum of diagnosed and undiagnosed cases, i.e.

    $14.6 \text{ million }+ 6.2 \text{ million }= 20.8 \text{ million}$

    $6.2 \text { million is } \dfrac{6.2}{20.8}\times 100 = 29.8\%$
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  3. #3
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    Re: Practical Math

    That was easier than i thought. Thank you so much.
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