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Math Help - ohms and power law

  1. #1
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    ohms and power law

    find the resistance of an electric light bulb if there is a current of 0.8 A and a voltage potential difference of 120 V.

    thankyou for any help with this one.
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    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcmango View Post
    find the resistance of an electric light bulb if there is a current of 0.8 A and a voltage potential difference of 120 V.

    thankyou for any help with this one.
    we use ohm's law here, the equation is

    V = IR

    where V is the voltage, I is the current in amps and R is the resistance in ohms

    => R = V/I = 120/0.8 = 150 ohms
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  3. #3
    Forum Admin topsquark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jhevon View Post
    we use ohm's law here, the equation is

    V = IR

    where V is the voltage, I is the current in amps and R is the resistance in ohms

    => R = V/I = 120/0.8 = 150 ohms
    Again, since the unit is named for a person it needs to be capitalized, so the unit is "Ohms."

    -Dan
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    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
    Again, since the unit is named for a person it needs to be capitalized, so the unit is "Ohms."

    -Dan
    My apologies again
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    Thanks for the help on this one. Also, i'll be sure to use "Ohms in the future, also"
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
    Again, since the unit is named for a person it needs to be capitalized, so the unit is "Ohms."

    -Dan
    I know this is a little old, but this is incorrect.

    You may refer to section 5.2 of the SI brochure (http://www.bipm.org/utils/common/pdf...chure_8_en.pdf), which specifies that names of all units are treated as ordinary nouns and start with a lower-case letter even when the symbol for the unit begins with a capital letter. Section 5.1 states that the first letter of a symbol is capitalized only if it is derived from a proper name (for instance Hz for hertz), or to avoid confusion (for instance, litre is allowed to be represented by L since the lower-case el looks the numeral one).
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