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Math Help - Geostationary satellite-What proportion of the satellites data capacity is used?

  1. #1
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    Geostationary satellite-What proportion of the satellites data capacity is used?

    This is my first post, hope I have got it in the right topic area.

    A geostationary satellite orbits the earth at a height of 36,000 km, the data rate available to and from the satellite is 100 kB/s. If transmitting 1000 bit frames using a one-bit sliding window protocol, what proportion of the satellite link's data capacity is used? (Assume the speed of light is 300,000 km/s.
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  2. #2
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    I didn’t want to include any part of my attempt at the question in the first post because I wanted to see someone else’s working out from start to finish but I will on this occasion to get the ball rolling and show that I have attempted this question.


    36,000*2=72,000
    Time = distance/speed
    72,000/300,000
    =0.24 of a second, 120 milliseconds each way

    Feel free to continue this question where I have left off or correct anything I have done above because I am not 100% sure on anything about this question.
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