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Math Help - a curious question about shooting

  1. #1
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    Question a curious question about shooting

    Hi all,
    I have a curious question about shooting.

    Suppose I shoot a gun 180 degree straight up to the sky, where will the bullet land and what will happen to the bullet?

    Thank you very much.
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenny20 View Post
    Hi all,
    I have a curious question about shooting.

    Suppose I shoot a gun 180 degree straight up to the sky, where will the bullet land and what will happen to the bullet?
    .
    You mean 90 degree straight up into the air .

    No wonder girls have no idea how to fire guns.
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  3. #3
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    No, 180 degree that mean I'm shooting my gun stright up to the sky.

    If 90 degree that mean I am aiming at the target in front of me.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenny20 View Post

    Sorry , 90 degree!!
    Ideally, a bullet is supposed to return to the same place where it started but because of the wind it does not. I saw this on the Mythbusters, they where doing the Myth if a bullet is shot straight up into the air will it kill when it returns down? They had a tough time doing the experiments because even though everything was 90 degrees perfectly the bullet ended up a supprising distance away from the original location.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThePerfectHacker View Post
    Ideally, a bullet is supposed to return to the same place where it started but because of the wind it does not. I saw this on the Mythbusters, they where doing the Myth if a bullet is shot straight up into the air will it kill when it returns down? They had a tough time doing the experiments because even though everything was 90 degrees perfectly the bullet ended up a supprising distance away from the original location.
    I think you mean 90 degree with the ground. And what I mean is my arm is 180 degree with my body. But anyway it is the same aiming to the sky.

    Thank you for your answer.

    Have you ever tried it - shoot your gun straight up to the sky?
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenny20 View Post
    Have you ever tried it - shoot your gun straight up to the sky?
    Yes, I was with a friend. He took the gun a shoot it straight into the air. The funny thing is that the .17 bullet returned to the same location and hit him. It was so funny, his reaction when it hit him. Took 20-30 seconds.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThePerfectHacker View Post
    Yes, I was with a friend. He took the gun a shoot it straight into the air. The funny thing is that the .17 bullet returned to the same location and hit him. It was so funny, his reaction when it hit him. Took 20-30 seconds.
    Was he hurt?
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