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Math Help - changing the log expression to equal expression with exponent

  1. #1
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    changing the log expression to equal expression with exponent

    does ln 1/e^6 = -6

    convert into 1/e^6 = e ^-6 ???
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  2. #2
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    Re: changing the log expression to equal expression with exponent

    Correct
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  3. #3
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    Re: changing the log expression to equal expression with exponent

    Quote Originally Posted by blondedude092 View Post
    does ln 1/e^6 = -6

    convert into 1/e^6 = e ^-6 ???
    Assuming you were trying to write \displaystyle \begin{align*} \ln{\left(\frac{1}{e^6}\right)} \end{align*}, yes you are correct
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    Re: changing the log expression to equal expression with exponent

    In general, ln(a)= b is the same as (converts into) e^b= a so, in particular, ln(1/e^{6})= -6, 1/e^6= e^{-6} because a= 1/e^6 and b= -6.
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    Re: changing the log expression to equal expression with exponent

    As an alternative we could say ln1/e^6 = ln1-lne^6 =0-6 = -6
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  6. #6
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    Re: changing the log expression to equal expression with exponent

    Quote Originally Posted by biffboy View Post
    As an alternative we could say ln1/e^6 = ln1-lne^6 =0-6 = -6
    I don't want to pick at you but to be exact

    ln1/e^6 = 0
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