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Math Help - Describing explicitly a linear transformation

  1. #1
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    Describing explicitly a linear transformation

    Describe explicitly a linear transformation T : R3 -> R3 which has as it ranges the subspace spanned by (1, 0, -1) and (1, 2, 2).

    This is what I wrote:

    T(R3) = a(1, 0, -1) + b(1, 2, 2) for all a, b in K (the underlying field).

    Since (1, 0, -1) and (1, 2, 2) span the range, I assume that means that you can take the linear combination of those two vectors and generate the range. But not sure if I did it right.
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zalren View Post
    Describe explicitly a linear transformation T : R3 -> R3 which has as it ranges the subspace spanned by (1, 0, -1) and (1, 2, 2).

    This is what I wrote:

    T(R3) = a(1, 0, -1) + b(1, 2, 2) for all a, b in K (the underlying field).

    Since (1, 0, -1) and (1, 2, 2) span the range, I assume that means that you can take the linear combination of those two vectors and generate the range. But not sure if I did it right.
    I'm not sure what you mean by "describe explicitely". Yes, any vector in the range of T can be written as a(1, 0, -1)+ b(1, 2, 2) and so T(v) (I would not write "T(R3)") must be of that form for some a and b.

    If you have no further information on T, that's about all you can say.
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