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Math Help - Proof for Part 2 of the fundamental theorm

  1. #1
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    Proof for Part 2 of the fundamental theorm

    Part 2 of the Fundamental Theorm of Algebra says that null space of matrix A is orthogonal to row space of A and left null space is orthogonal to column space.

    How can one prove this?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Avi06 View Post
    Part 2 of the Fundamental Theorm of Algebra says that null space of matrix A is orthogonal to row space of A and left null space is orthogonal to column space.

    Uuh? The fundamental Theorem of Algebra, as far as I know, is the one that states that the field of complex numbers is an algebraically closed field, and has nothing to do directly with matrices.

    And what you want about matrices is here in "relation to the null space":
    Row space - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Tonio

    How can one prove this?
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  3. #3
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    Perhaps this is the "fundamental theorem of linear algebra"!
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